Skip to main content

About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CNNW 19
MSNBCW 6
CSPAN2 5
KQED (PBS) 3
CNBC 2
CSPAN 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 52
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
president left office and fled to russia. white house correspondent jim acosta is with me, and fred polite jen is in moscow, and we will start with jim. first the president made it clear that e he is going to stand with the international community in handling the message with ukraine, and it was a tough message in the 90-minute phone call? >> yes, it was a tough message and we know that the presidents spoke a week and a day ago, but developments have been move sog qui quickly in ukraine with the russian involvement that the president came down hard today in if statement. he said that the united states condemns russia's military intervention in the crimean territory, and i want to put this up on the screen, because this illustrates the statement heref. just how concerned the white house is about what is happening by russia. the united states calls on russia to deescalate tensions by withdrawing the forces back to bases in crimea, and to refrain from interference elsewhere in ukraine. the reason i isolate that particular sentence from the statement, jim, is because it is a couple of things.
as we've been reporting all afternoon, jim. you saw the pictures coming out of the white house. defense secretary chuck hagel, cia director john brennan, talking about the situation in ukraine and discussing policy options. i should note, jim, that just outside the gates of the white house at this very moment there is a protest going on. some ukranians have gathered outside the north fence to talk about what they would like to see happen. they would like to see the u.s. get more involved. but as the hours go on, jim, i think we're going to get a clearer indication as to how this phone call went down between these two leaders. as you mentioned, they did speak a week ago friday. and you heard the president in the briefing room yesterday issuing that warning to vladimir putin that there would be costs if russia intervenes in ukraine. >> want to point out, jim, while those folks were meeting there in the white house for an emergency session in effect to discuss ukraine those pictures we just saw might explain that the president was on the phone with several world leaders including we now kn
, reporting from moscow, let's go to the white house right now, our senior white house correspondent jim acosta is standing by. jim, there were important meetings in the west wing of the white house, we saw the top national security advise scores leafing the west wing of the white house. i assume they'll be issuing a statement or someone will be going before the cameras, what are you hearing? >> reporter: and this is eerily similar to when the president was weighing whether to use military force against syria, there were some tense moments over here at the white house on some weekends as you will'll recall, wolf, and these principal meetings do occur from time to time. it does appear that one occurred this afternoon but the white house has to officially congrfi that mississippi t-- that that s the case. the chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey. so it does a appear that senior officials have been meeting with the president here about this situation in ukraine. and you know, wolf, you've been talking about options a that the white house has available to it, options that the preside
to jim acosta at the white house. what is the latest in terms of diplomatic efforts on the u.s. front? >> president obama met with his national security advisers earlier this evening, they're not really looking at military options, at least according to what the white house is saying. they're focused on what can be done economically and diplomatically, you heard this talk over the weekend that u.s. and allies won't go to the g-8 summit this summer in russia. the u.s. is cancelling all military engagements that it has with the russians, that's a new step that took place this evening. you mentioned that secretary of state john kerry is heading over to kiev to talk about financial assistance that he is brings promises of from the united states and hopefully according to this white house from european allies, but the president believes that the world is on his side, not vladimir putin's side, the question is whether vladimir putin is listening. >> and in terms of options that the united states has. i mean, there are not a huge number of options. >> there aren't a whole lot of options, the
of a priority is that? >> reporter: i think that's going to be the big priority, jim. nobody wants to see this escalate. and we've been talking throughout the day about how the u.s. and russia have so many issues that they're working on together. on syria, on iran. definitely don't want any of those to suffer and don't want to see any type of military intervention getting any larger in ukraine. so i think right now the discussions are centered around how can they send a message to president putin not just that there will be costs which is the stick but what's the carrot, that if you can be part of the solution, if you could help develop a strong independent democratic ukraine you can have wide-ranging relationships on the diplomatic, political and economic front with ukraine similar to a country like finland which is a neighbor of russia which has very close ties with the european union but also has a very good, close economic and political relationship with russia. so i think what you're hearing at the united nations, even though there's a lot of tough rhetoric going on, you heard ambass
for us here at cnn, jim sciutto. jim, what are your sources telling you tonight? i think we've got to emphasize, the white house hasn't said much about this and nobody expected the president of the united states to come out and make a statement about the ukraine. >> well, the white house hasn't said much but they were certainly worried about it and i've been hearing from a number of different parts of the government as their anxiety grew over the last 24 and 48 hours that something like this would happen. we've all seen the public statements from u.s. officials, from secretary kerry, secretary hagel warning russia not to do exactly what appears to have happened now in the ukraine and that is, send russian troops in. u.s. officials believe these are russia troops. over time, they are getting a better handle and the extent of the troops. this is a scenario that some had warned me about. the idea of tran it would be something more sought tell, special ops and black ops to get more cover and you see the russians getting legal cover here. the ambassador to the u.n. saying that the movem
can deliver, beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> clearly the administration is getting ready to act. no decision made yet on whether to impose those sanctions or, indeed, which sanctions to impose but they want to have the options ready. and today we heard the president warn that his goal is to isolate russia and make its actions in ukraine very costly. with russian troops now swarming, sovereigning ukrainian territory, preparing likely sanctions against russia. president obama vowing today to make russia's military intervention a costly proposition. >> what we're indicating to the russians is that if, in fact, they continue on the projectory that they are on, we are going to have a negative impact on russia's economy and its status in the world. >> reporter: the possible sanctions include freezing the overseas assets of russian individuals and companies, banning travel for russian leaders and businessmen and at the more extreme end, blocking some russian banks from the international financial system, an enormously costly situation for russ
. let's bring in with our national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> wolf, officials are attempting to de-escalate the crisis and avoiding any moves that may further inflame the situation. does russia expand its military intervention or does it pull back? on the ground in ukraine, there's a volatile mix of armed forces and emotions, which we saw flair up today. today in crimea, russian and ukrainian forces in a dramatic and dangerous standoff. weapons drawn and here a threat to open fire. >> i said stop! i'm serious. i'll shoot at your legs. >> reporter: and as secretary of state john kerry arrived in the ukrainian capital of kiev, a war of words. russian president vladimir putin and secretary kerry trading die metric clee opposed views of the crisis. back and forth. >> translator: the acting president, of course, is not legitimate. >> the elected representatives of the people of ukraine, they overwhelmingly approve the new government. >> reporter: and back and forth. >> translator: citizens of ukraine, both russian and ukrainian, what worries them? they are worried a
escalating by the moment. we just heard a little while ago from jim acosta, our senior white house correspondent, the united states is now actively considering the possibility of not attending the g-8 summit in sochi, russia, in june unless the russians withdraw their troops from ukraine. don't get involved militarily. the immediate and former u.s. ambassador to russia, michael mcfaul is joining us once again. he's back in stanford university, only back a couple days, ambassador and the situation is escalating by the moment. i want you to listen to what senator john mccain told us here in "the situation room" just a little while ago about president obama. >> it's been clear that maybe the president of the united states has been a bit naive about vladimir putin and his ambitions. >> you served the president of the united states, you were named as his ambassador in moscow, you're a scholar when it comes to russia and the former soviet union. is the president a bit naive when it comes to putin? >> no. and i worked with the president for five years, wolf. i worked with at the white hou
with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto here tw latest. jim? >> i think you could say today we saul the full yin and yang of the u.s. policy response to the crisis in crimea. on the other side, secretary of defense chuck hagel demonstrating the u.s. commitment to its nato allies with the deployment of some aircraft and the cancellation-of nato contacts with russia. on the diplomatic side, we saw the opening of a diplomatic path to solving the crisis, the so-called off ramp u.s. officials have mentioned before, still undefined, kerry said, but a start. >> reporter: u.s. and russian diplomats face to face for the first time since the start of the crisis in crimea. secretary of state john kerry said they are now negotiating a diplomatic path to ending it. >> we are committed to working with russia. together with our friends and allies in an effort to provide a way for this entire situation to find the road to deescalation. >> reporter: russian and ukrainian officials, however, did not meet. >> why didn't you meet lavrov today? >> reporter: but as the diplomats talk or don
followed by "saturday night live" hosted by jim parsons with musical guest bet. it's not stopped since 5:00 central time. with the initials of gsh, george s. hole las, founder of the bears. formerly in chicago. the only two original nfl franchises from the founding of the leafs. green bay came along soon after, but they wanted to emphasize in chicago there were only two who have gone all those years. i have nothing to say about what we just saw. >> ed: maybe they slipped on the tarp. >> mike: is there another game after this, shirts and skins? i hope they enjoyed it. 4:15 go in the third. swatted at by engelland. forehanded shot. he and rozsival after that one. rozsival tried to chip further and then it is sutter, feeding one. and then battled for and slugged wide by engelland, taken on by leddy. jammed it again. handzus. thrown across to engelland. tapped on by rozsival. swatted by versteeg. thrown by niskanen. paddled aside by crawford. crawford as toews have been impressive. no one more than jonathan toews. led back across. leddy taking inover there. a shot is blocked down by marc-and
evening. i'm jim axelrod. it has been a day of high tension in ukraine, in particular the southern peninsula known as crimea. russia has sent thousands of troops into crimea where many ethnic russians live. the troops were deployed after the russian parliament gave vladimir putin the go-ahead to use military force to protect russian interests in crimea. the new government in ukraine, which had a revolution last weekend, has respond bide moving their military to i state they call "combat alert." u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon said he is gravely concerned, and nato said there's, "an urgent need for desque alation." elizabeth palmer joins us from southern ukraine. liz, what are you seeing? >> reporter: jim, it's been a day of real escalation here in southern ukraine. some of the soldiers you mentioned were specifically sent from a russian military base across the border, into the ukraine. and they're taking control of roads, crimean airspace is closed to civilian flights, and the acting ukrainian prime minister has warned the nation that military intervention by russia would lead
an act of aggression against ukraine. what's happening now and what does it all mean? nbc's jim maceda is in moscow. bill neely is in crimea. jim, we start with you in the russian capital there. what does that approval of putin's request to use russian troops mean? >> reporter: hi, craig. you're right. it is pretty symbolic. the legislative body that putin requested that use of force from is a rubber stamp, upper house of parliament. and it doesn't mean that putin will now send in more troops into crimea. there are thousands there already all part of russia's black sea fleet. large numbers have been seen there over the past 48 hours, securing airports, government buildings, telecom towers. what the approval does mean is it's official now. russians have been mobilized in crimea. they can now all put their patches back on. and the approval of course gives putin more options. it allows him to strike not only crimea but anywhere in ukraine. and of course that spikes the tension even higher. >> jim, any word at this point on a timetable? >> reporter: not that we're aware of, no. but i can t
at the military might of ukraine and russia, we'll have an international security analyst jim walsh, at the bottom of the hour, at 6:30. there's more online at aljazeera.com. we have a live blog updating the crisis in ukraine. still ahead on aljazeera.com. it's two days before fat tuesday. we'll head live to new orleans for mardi gras. plus... >> i'm stand -- stephanie stanton, the rain storms in california are on the way out. was it enough to dent the drought. >> and dreams coming true - we head to the red carpet as oscar gets ready to steal the limelight tonight. >> welcome back. after months of drought california has seen a lot of rain. it's still not enough to ease the dry spell. stephanie stanton has more. >> it is welcome rain here in this community, an hour north of the los angeles. anywhere between 1-6 inches fell. meteorologists say it's nowhere near enough to break the drought that has been plaguing california in recent years. >> a large area is at 5-25% of normal, even after the rain fall week. it puts it in perspective, and the entire area is below 50% of normal. >> the terrible thing
cost benefit analysis, ukraine is hugely important to russia. and i want to maintain high jim any over it. and these incidental sanctions can i weather them and in due course the united states and europe will back off them because they don't have staying power. i will get what they want and they won't hurt me that much. that's their calculus. what's our calculus? >> ambassador, thank you, sir. enjoy london. >> thank you. >> and general bob scales insists russian president putin is bluffing that u.s. intervention must be on the table. i will tell you most people have military fatigue and you put it on the table. >> well, first of all understand russian military forces are very weak. they don't have a draft army. not a single stealth fighter. their navy can't get out of ports. it it really is the gang that couldn't shoot straight. we have still a very strong military. we ought to leverage that asymmetry. is that a threat or actually a follow-through? there are two things there. one is a threat to sort of scare them because they have a pathetic military and the other one is to actually co
heels for a little while until the story clarifies. let's bring in our ace team. michael farr, jim iuorio and zachary karabell. gentlemen, let me go to mr. iuorio because i kind of liked what warren buffett had to say. buy farmland, by stock, by hard assets, don't buy money, i don't really think this is going to be world war ii and you don't think you do either. but in general terms, is buffett right? >> i agree, too. when he said it also he did definitely say that in times of war, which you and i both agree we're not there -- but i have been doing that over the last year and a half. diversifying into things like that. i believe that's a smart way to go. >> michael farr, do you believe it's a smart way to go? what i'm suggesting, i hope it's in line with mr. buffett. but i'm saying fundamentally this economy -- you saw it today. we had a good ism in manufacturing, maybe nobody paid attention to it because of the ukraine. we also had a pretty good personal spending and income number. nobody paid attention to that. the economy is growing at 2.5%. labor profits are so low, i don't thi
anniversary of the brady handgun violence prevention act. forcontrol advocates pass expanded prevention. jim brady was shot in the head during an assassination attempt on reagan and 1981. sarah brady is the founder of the brady foundation. she is the police chief of baltimore and gun violence victims were at the spent today. >> good morning. welcome. i am the president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. we are very clear to be here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the brady law and to release our new report. before we get to those things, we want to begin by showing why we're all here. why our mission is so vitally important and why we cannot ever give up. >> good morning. my name is kenny barnes. i live in washington dc. i'm a victim of senseless gun violence. this is a picture of my son. he was killed september 24, 2001. right here in washington, d.c. on the corner of 11th and u stre et northwest. >> good morning. my name is eddie. , my mother was shot to death in front of me. the gun was also turned on me. it malfunctioned. i am here today along with other victims and su
a russian military base there, as well as ethnic russians living in the region. let's go to nbc's jim maceda with the very latest on this. jim, let's get the latest. are we seeing something that could be another cold war brewing here between the u.s. and russia, ultimately? >> reporter: alex, well, the first sign things were going seriously south today was this morning when russian foreign minister sergei lavrov said that ukrainian power militaries actually attacked the ministry in crimea, wounding several people, presumably ethnic russians. despite there being no confirmation, no evidence of that, that alleged threat to russian compatriots in ukraine triggered a quick escalation, which russia has used many times before to justify an invasion. first the leader of ethnic russians in crimea called on president putin to send forces in to protect them from hostile extremists. then very quickly putin replied, requesting the use of force. and as you said in your lead, getting that request from force from the parliament. all that happening within just hours. now, that doesn't mean, alex, that putin
-minute warning on that. kristen welker at the white house. stay with us, obviously. we want to go to jim maceda on the line with us, on the phone from moscow. jim, we are told that the 3red plead and also vladimir putin have had words and spoken to one another on the phone. what can you tell us about that? >> i don't have insight into that phone call but from my perch in moscow, we cannot underestimate the deep sense of rebee trail that president putin feels at this point, given the way the events eventually unfolded. they thought the february 21st agreement would lead to a series of benchmark, a timeline that would have taken yanukovych, kept him in power until the end of the year and then suddenly, everything was flipped on its ear. putin found himself outside of the loop as all of these forces, a whole new group of people that putin mistrusts profoundly were suddenly calling the shots, not from inside kiev's parliament, but from the streets of kiev. -- >> let's go now to president obama at the white house. thank you, jim. >> the united states has been responding to events as they unfold in u
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
right, ian williams, thank you for that report. >>> let's turn now to russia where nbc's jim maceda joins us from moscow. what's the latest from there, jim, particularly in the wake of the news conference that putin held yesterday? >> reporter: hi, kristen. well, from the -- certainly from this perch here, it does feel like a flurry of diplomacy in the past 24 hours. the chances of avoiding war in the ukraine seems to be getting a boost, particularly from putin's comments yesterday, tuesday, that he saw no need to use force in ukraine and had no desire to annex the crimean peninsula. those two comments really allowed the military confrontation that we've been reporting on to take a step b k back. and even though, as ian reports, crimea remains tense on the ground today with a new report that russians had seized two ukrainian anti-missile posts, the perception still is that ukraine is spinning now not towards war, but towards some kind of diplomatic solution. secretary of state john kerry's meeting with sergey lavrov, for instance, starting in paris in less than an hour, is their fi
to this ukraine crisis. our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto, monitoring what's going on. and, you know, these diplomats, u.n. envoy basically held there. it getting ugly. but maybe lavrov and kerry, they do have a personal relationship that goes way back. maybe they can come up with something. >> they do. relationship that helped with that chemical weapons deal in certi syria. you look at the incident with the u.n. envoy and other skirmishes. you remember yesterday we saw ukrainian and russian soldiers go nose to nose and shots fired in the air. this is why you need diplomacy now. you need the sides talking to each other, to deescalate. because you have a very volatile mix of guys with guns on the ground there, and emotions that have been stoked up by russian propaganda. and remember, these gangs, these ununiformed gangs, kind of pro-russian militias, there is a russian hand in that. that's a tool of russian power on the ground there. this is not happening by accident. those guys coming together. and you know, we've talked about this before. once you get that genie out of the
is the star of the show, your host, jim lang. >> thank you. bill: that is an american icon right there. jim lang, the long-time host of "the dating game" has left us, dying yesterday at his home in mill valley, california of a heart attack. best known for hosting "the dating game" for more than a decade. look at those guys. here we go, ladies. since 1965 he helped people pick a potential suitor in secret. celebrities like mack call jackson, steve martin, farrah fawcett all appeared on the show. he later returned to radio. his first love as morning disk jockey before retiring 80 years ago. jim lang lange was 81 years young. martha: you had that then. and hot tubs and fantasy suites. that was a much simpler time. that was first reality shows. send them on a date. tell them how the it was. bachelor number two, bill hemmer. bill: step right up. martha: obamacare has been front and center and will continue to be as we get closer to midterm elections as balance of power is back up for grabs in very real way. both sides are using the affordable care act in ad campaigns as you might imagine to atta
's political and economic crisis? cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto explains. >> reporter: there's a lot of questions about russia's interest in the ukraine as well as the west. first a reminder here. ukraine is in europe not a million miles away, the capital few municipal-bond miles away that americans travel to all the time, paris, london, rome. western border key u.s. aslice, slovakia, hungary and romania, poland. ukraine not a member of nato but there's been talk about bringing them in. let's get a better sense of russia's interest there. you look at crimea. on the tip of that peninsula, the sevastopol military headquarters. access to the black sea, mediterranean, atlantic, essential for russia and first place that many of those 6,000 and even more russian troops went when they crossed the border from russia into crimea. sovereign ukrainian territory. let's look inside the country as well because there's a split. western part of the country here liens towards europe, 5% of the population in these parts speak ethnic russian. eastern part 75% here speak russian, ethnic f
stories you have heard. jim ingle with that. plus, a timeline on the irs targeting conservatives scandal. stay tuned. for over a decade millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exi. avoid if you te clopidogrel. for many, relief is at hand. ask your doctor abouxium. >>> the obama administration has made another change to obamacare, ordering states to pay subsidies first and verify eligibility later. retroactive enrollment idea sparked criticism from republican house energy and commerce subcommittee chairman joe pitts who called that move outrageous. complaints about obamacare from many different people are nothing new. to hear some top democrats tell it, all of those obamacare hor
. [applause] i also want to mention m bassett -- i would also want to mention american ambassador jim warlick. ,fghanistan faces challenges and all of us are aware of those challenges. the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place echo the afghan presidential candidates, a number of them i spoke to in kabul are in favor of starting ae bsa. i think it is certainty that it will be signed. whether or not karzai signs it is irrelevant. we need to make sure we plan effectively for him not signing it and moving forward. i truly hope that any of the ambassador dobbins mentioned that might occur if there is delay are mitigated effectively by the great planning capacity that our military and state department have. i don't believe there's is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the , as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this cop -- to , is topic of afghan security have visited afghanistan 20 or 30 times and lived there for a couple of years. when andrew, alex and i were working on afghanistan in the earlier decade, the afghan di
forces military, civilian and, of course, our afghan colleagues that continue despite every day, jim, thank you very much. alex and i were saying he gave his keynote address and a what are the rest of us supposed to say? andrew asked if i would talk about reconciliation, elections and a very important topic i think, the politics of the future relationship of between afghanistan and pakistan. i would be pleased to do that but before i do, i just wanted to step back just for a moment really and make three points and asked one question. i think it's relevant to the entire conversation we're going to have today. first point, that's the one that has been emphasized here both in the fields that we saw previously and ambassador dobbins speech and the points that intimate. it's really important it seems to me when we talk about afghanistan to stop just for a moment and recognize what has been achieved. not just what has been achieved but what has been achieved at such great cost on the part of afghans, part of the united states military and civilian, and, of course, our international partner
national security correspondent, jim sciutto, is here watching all of this. it's fast-moving right now. and a lot of us didn't think it was going to get this bad. but there is potential for a whole lot worse. >> no question. that's been the consistent warning from u.s. officials. don't -- to the russians. don't do any actions that can be misinterpreted. right? and now on the ground there, you are having actions that can easily be misinterpreted. are those forces that you're seeing there supported by the russians, directed by the russians? we don't know for sure. >> are they russians? >> or are they russians, exactly. we don't know for sure, but that's exactly the kind of thing that can be misinterpreted and can further inflame the situation on the ground. >> the outgoing -- now the former u.s. ambassador in moscow, mike mcfaul, he spoke out on cnn's "new day" today, 48 hours since he left moscow, back at stanford university. but i want you to listen to what he said, because it's ominous. >> it's a very dangerous situation, extremely tense. you have soldiers with guns, very well-armed i
joining me now from moscow is nbc's jim maceda. jim, with a good evening to you. a lot of diplomatic salvos being tossed back and forth here. but what's happening on the ground in crimea? >> reporter: hi, alex. you're right. it's hard to keep up with them all. tonight, crimea looking pretty much neutralized. russian forces have now been moving freely around the peninsula for a couple of days because they are mostly off the streets. they and the armed vigilante groups, if you will, are in control. airport, the telecommunication towers. today as you alerted, units of russian troopser driving to various ukrainian military posts trying to persuade the ukrainian soldiers to hand over their weapons. and then surrounding the posts of those who refuse to disarm. just taking them out of operation. so despite all of the appeals that we're hearing from the united states, from kiev. from the west in general, those diplomatic salvos, as you call them, to put his forces, putin's forces back, to pull them back, crimea today effectively is in vladimir putin's hands, alex. >> okay. so, jim, the new u
the last word. >> it's different than the jim crow south. it was a state-sanctioned discrimination that was flatly unconstitutional. and there was a governmental interesting ensuring that you could travel, but you couldn't if no hotel would serve you. in this case, the wedding industry is not bristling with hostility to gay people. you are dealing with the occasional waker or florist with an objection. you can find another one. >> got to take a break. back in two minute s. and the call to action for young african-american men. magic johnson, colin powell and our experts weigh in. >>> and later, will bill clinton be a bigger draw than barack obama on the campaign trail. >>> and the tea party turns five. yup. all 5 of you for $17. our clients need a lot of attention. there's unlimited talk and text. we're working deals all day. you get 10 gigabytes of data to share. what about expansion potential? add a line, anytime, for $15 a month. low dues, great terms. let's close! new at&t mobile share value plans our best value plans ever for business. ovis going to grow by over 90 unmillion
.s. officials. much of the world is on edge right now. let's go over to jim sciutto. he's been following all of these developments. it's sort of reminiscent of the battle days of the cold war. >> no question. you get a clear sense of how concerned administration officials are by the repeated, stern warnings delivered at the highest level to russia. on friday, president obama called russian president vladimir putin. today, we heard it from defense secretary chuck hagel, secretary of state john kerry and jay carney. the message verbatim. do not send russian troops into the ukraine and the u.s. will be watching. this is all as violence broke out on the streets of the ukraine today. today, pa frightening taste of worse-case scenario for the ukraine, the country divided among ethnic lines. adding to the tension, russian warplanes placed on high alert and russian troops mobilizing for military exercises right along the ukraine eastern border. with the obama administration increasingly concerned about russian's intentions, president obama issued a stern warning. >> i urged him not to take any steps
said is really concerned. they want to iron it out in a united peaceful fashion. >> jim, talk a little bit about the concern from the perspective of the administration. russia is so key in so many discussions. you are talking about iran. you are talking about syria. so key and also such a thorn in the side of u.s. diplomacy in the u.s. reaching objectives. what does this mean for those other efforts? >> regional and global as you say. russia is central to any possible solution in syria. russia is central to the nuclear deal being negotiated and a difficult with iran. as the relationship runs into trouble over ukraine, the department said that russia is good at compartmentalizing these issues and can focus on one or the other. these are personal. there is a breech of trust here. also to jill's point. i think it's important. president obama lnchsed this. offering in effect an off-ramp saying you have your concerns in the eastern part of the country. let's address the concerns so that one, to remove that excuse if it needs an excuse to allow the troops to come in. also a face saving move.
. senator, thank you very much for joining us today. as you know from our own jim miklaszewski and interviews with martin dempsey, the joint chiefs chairman and what the president has said to karzai, we are not going to wait for anything further from him, we have given up on him. so what happens if we end up withdrawing all troops from afghanistan? >> it could be a problem. i mean, in terms of just the security in afghanistan, the troops there, their forces have improved a great deal. they are miles ahead of where they were just a few years ago, but are they going to be able to resist a kind of hit-and-run guerilla war by the taliban. and the other issue is counter terrorism and what our basis is there. this is a real problem and the president is doing a real thing by calling karzai's bluff. he left the door open, though, there's a presidential election coming up in a couple months, and the new president might be ready to sign this thing. the irony is they had this convention of the whole leadership of the whole country, and they said yes to the whole deal. and now karzai, i do
that codified regulation that recalls back to the worst excesses of jim crow. >> it's not the first time arizona has gotten into an issue here with the n.f.l. the n.f.l. did take a position back in 1993 the n.f.l. pulled the super bowl out of address because it refused to recognize martin luther king jr. day and that was quick. it was only a matter of hours after the vote that this commissioner paul tagligu decided no the to do that is romminger goodell amend today's n.f.l. just not as strong as the n.f.l. was back then? >> it's interesting. paul taglibu was a commissioner who had a record of trying to do the right thing even if it was not in the best interest of ownership. if you look at all of roger goodell's decisions, it's about disciplining players and never about disciplining ownership. this would have been one of those cases where it would have hurt the bottom line of the n.f.l. if they tried to pull a move off like this because the event you mentioned, paul taglibu said we will pull the super bowl. he announced that in 90. they said we will celebrate martin luther king's holiday and tagl
and everyone is talking about the masked men. jims. >> lebron james knows how to make a fashion statement. like you. he has been creating a buzz after wearing a black mask to protect his broken nose. he said he went with the batman look to match the miami uniforms. the kings scoring 31. james did not get league approval to wear the shield. they said it's a no-no. according to an n.b.a. official the league prefers the players to wear the clear shield so opponents can see the eyes. >> i like the black mask. >> the new york yankees broadcasting live on three tv networks in japan at 3am for a spring training game. here is the reason why. masahiro tanaka made a debut against the phillies, and the $155 million input was very good. the 25 year-old masahiro tanaka dazzled, three strike outs in two scoreless ippings of work. throwing 31 pitches, receiving a standing ovation as he left the field. >> tiger woods got his mojo back. he got off to a rough start. he barely made the cut yesterday. tiger was getting his grove on like you would not believe. he carded 65. tiger is sitting at 5-under par for the t
correspondent jim sciutto. there's so many policies and cultures. it seems far away but it isn't. >> ukraine is in europe, kiev is miles away from rome, paris, london, that kind of thing and we have u.s. allies just to the west, poland, slovakia, hungary, romania. the u.s. is required to defend these countries militarily if they come under threat. >> crimea, appropriately colored red. why? >> because it has that pull toward russia. russia, right on the tip of russia, it's the headquarters of their black sea fleet, their on warm water port, all of the ports up here are cold, they don't have access to them in the winter. this is key. it's key when those thousands of russian troops moved into crimea, it where they went. >> people will remember this place throughout history. you had famous things happening here as part of its separation, we were talking earlier, florence nightingale. >> that's right, long ties between this part of the world and seems a million miles away in europe. >> the charge of the light brigade back in the 1850s. this went against the wrong front there and it proved very co
will mention ambassador jim warlick and ambassador dobbins who did a great job. so we have a great agreement in place. what is the future with that agreement? it will be difficult. afghanistan faces challenges and, all of us are aware of those challenges but i think the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place? the afghan people have spoken. the afghan presidential candidates, a number of whom i spoke to in kabul when i was there are all in favor of signing the bsa i think it's a virtual certainty the bsa will be signed. the issue whether president karzai signs it or not in my view is irrelevant. we need to plan on effectively him not signing it and move forward. i truly hope that any of the costs ambassador dobbins said might occur if there is delay might be effected by the great planning capacity our agencies have. i don't think there is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the long game as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this topic of the afghan security forces which i not going to be expert i visited afghanistan
. the multi million dollar profollow owe she manages with jim cramer. >> investors on edge, and they are selling stocks as the conflict with ukraine and russia escalates. is there anything the u.s. can do? >> warren buffet speaks. what does the world's famous investor think? we talk to him about that, the economy and more. >> winter storms kept car shoppers at home for the second straight month. will deal es offer
freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start with a thank you but i want to thank our panelists, chris, kim and michael o'hanlon. put this together on the fly yesterday. i want to thank all of you for coming out in this but we thought this is such a critical issue as you're trying to follow over the weekend of a lot of people talking about a lot of things that nobody had chance to catch their breath. and have a dialogue. and i think this is an enormous opportunity with three preseason and listen been looking at these issues in studying this part of the world for a long time. to actually have a deep breath and a kind of reasoned, principled discussion about what's happened, what does it mean, where are we going from your and what are our options. i couldn't be more thrilled at these guys are jumping into do this. chris is the executive director at the foreign policy institute. kim holmes is a distinguished fellow, long distance grew not just your heritage but also at the u.s. sta
here optimistic. thank you very much. >> thank you, jim. excellent job. >> jed, foreign policy analysts at the heritage foundation discussed recent developments in ukraine, including rush military intervention and efforts to impose sanctions on vladmir putin's government. this is an hour 10 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. so i'm going to be extremely brief so we get right to the topic. i want to start with a thank you. i want to thank our panelists, chris, kim, michael hammond who tried to put this together on the fly yesterday. i want to thank all of you for coming out. but we thought this is such a critical issue. if you're trying to follow something on the weekend a lot of people were stalking about a lot of things but nobody had kind after chance to catch their breath and have a dialogue. this is see norm news opportunity with three very seasoned analysts, who are looking at these issues and studying this part of the world for a long time and have a deep breath, and have reasoned principled discussion what happened, what does it mean, where are we going from here and what are our
.com. founded by jim cramer, the street.com is an independent source for stock market analysis. cramer's action alerts plus service is home to his multimillion dollar portfolio. you can learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> record close. fed chair janet yellen puts investors in a buying mood, pushing s & p to new highs at the close. should her comments be interpreted as a green light for stock investors? >>> return to profit. a surprisingly strong quarter for electronics retailer best buy. but is it proof that the company's turn around is on solid footing? >>> and what did general motors know and when did they know it? regulators are asking whether e
alerts plus. the multi million dollar profollow owe she manages with jim cramer. >> investors on edge, and they are selling stocks as the conflict with ukraine and russia escalates. is there anything the u.s. can do? >> warren buffet speaks. what does the world's famous investor think? we talk to him about that, the economy and more. >> winter storms kept car shoppers at home for the second straight month. will deal es off
." we're joined by jim from moscow. it may not be a zero sum game as far as kerry is concerned but it is as far as vladimir putin's concerned, isn't it? he's been incredibly silent over the last two weeks. what's going on with him here? >> reporter: that's right. what happens next will obviously be very much dependent on what vladimir putin does next, and so far we simply haven't heard from the guy. he had a meeting yesterday with his top security council but no information came out of that and i think that this is really what's driving the uncertainty about what russia does next, because putin, after all, must be reeling from the loss of face, if nothing else, from this revolution in ukraine especially given the timing of it, right at the height of putin's olympic glory, and we still don't know what he's planning. perhaps he's waiting to see what the makeup is of the new government in kiev, before he plays his hand. in any case, julia, the overall sense we're getting from experts we're talking to here in moscow is that putin would only use intervention or even encourage a spli
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)